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Hi all, <?: prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:eek:ffice:eek:ffice" />

I'm hoping someone can help me with some info or a guide of
how to replace a broken front coil spring on my Mk1 Ford Kuga. I've searched
the forums and read a lot of posts where people have had them replaced by a
garage or replaced them themselves but I can't find anyone that has put up a ""how
to guide""� and there are a few videos on youtube for a Ford Focus, but not for a
Kuga coil spring. Just trying to find out if there are any handy tips, do's and
don'ts, which/how many bolts to remove,
what order to remove things in and any specialist tools required for the job.

Thanks in advance for any help you can give me

Andy Allan

Black Mk1 2010 AWD Titanium 163
 

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I have just posted similar myself - I searched and nothing came up.

I don't suppose you have any hints, tips or guide on the process. I am at work and not with the car so its hard to visualise the suspension set up.
 

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I am not that familiar with the MK1,

Presume a McPherson strut, and I am sure you have to jack the wishbone down so it can release clear.

Once out on the bench easy job to do with spring compressors.

ALWAYS change in pairs, and if the shocks have done 70k+ miles, think about changing them as well.
 

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The rear spring is a separate unit from the strut, so no spring compressors required..

Jack the rear of the car up and support on axle stands.. undo the bottom bolt of the shock absorbed and the rear trailing arm should drop down.. the spring can be lifted out and replaced.
You then need to jack the trailing arm back up and relocate the bottom shock absorber's bolt.

this is from an "escape".. very similar to the kuga setup..

some very good advice above on considering replacement of the shock absorbers at the same time... shouldn't take more than 45mins to do both sides
 

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The rear spring is a separate unit from the strut, so no spring compressors required..

Jack the rear of the car up and support on axle stands.. undo the bottom bolt of the shock absorbed and the rear trailing arm should drop down.. the spring can be lifted out and replaced.
You then need to jack the trailing arm back up and relocate the bottom shock absorber's bolt.

this is from an "escape".. very similar to the kuga setup..
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8nnMPZQkSRk

some very good advice above on considering replacement of the shock absorbers at the same time... shouldn't take more than 45mins to do both sides


Great thank you - I did have a quick look after work and just a few bits in the way and the biggest problem is going to be the locking wheel nut as the tool looks damaged ! - first job is tyre fitter to get them all removed and new set fitted.

I have worked on various cars in the past and it does look fairly straight forward so that you again for the link and if I can find the old phone or camera I may be able to sort out a guide for future.

The shocks were replaced the year after we bought the car as oneside was leaking badly - they are therefore only 3 years old now and do look ok - from what I could see last night.

kind regards
Paul
 

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Great thank you - I did have a quick look after work and just a few bits in the way and the biggest problem is going to be the locking wheel nut as the tool looks damaged ! - first job is tyre fitter to get them all removed and new set fitted.

I have worked on various cars in the past and it does look fairly straight forward so that you again for the link and if I can find the old phone or camera I may be able to sort out a guide for future.

The shocks were replaced the year after we bought the car as oneside was leaking badly - they are therefore only 3 years old now and do look ok - from what I could see last night.

kind regards
Paul
you should manage it no problem!!

I had a look on eurocarparts for the replacement springs and surprisingly, couldn't come up with rears??

next port of call was here:
https://www.mister-auto.co.uk/coil-spring/ford/kuga/kuga-i-2-5-4x4-200hp-2009/

I've used Mister Auto before without issue, good prices and fast shipping... be good to see the 'how to' once you're finished.
 

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@Paul_a_uk , are you doing the front or rear?



The rear is easy (like Martin1977 posted) but the front end is not an easy task. (Assuming the Mk1 front end is very similar to the Mk2.)



I looked at how the Focus front end was done on Youtube, but the Kuga can't be done the same way- more disassembly is required. You can't get the lower arm/ hub low enough to release the bottom end of the strut without either compressing the strut spring somehow (impossible using normal spring compressors due to the lack of clearance) or removing the steering arm/ lower ball joint. Don't try forcing it down (like shown in Focus videos) as you'll risk popping the inner CV joint- which isn't meant to come apart.
 

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@Paul_a_uk , are you doing the front or rear?



The rear is easy (like Martin1977 posted) but the front end is not an easy task. (Assuming the Mk1 front end is very similar to the Mk2.)



I looked at how the Focus front end was done on Youtube, but the Kuga can't be done the same way- more disassembly is required. You can't get the lower arm/ hub low enough to release the bottom end of the strut without either compressing the strut spring somehow (impossible using normal spring compressors due to the lack of clearance) or removing the steering arm/ lower ball joint. Don't try forcing it down (like shown in Focus videos) as you'll risk popping the inner CV joint- which isn't meant to come apart.

Its the rear springs that I am attempting.

Easy is NOT the word I would use - there is little room for the compression tool due to the lower arm being rather wide with a high ridge around where the spring sits and every bolt was seized despite using penetrating oil several times during the week.

As I couldn't get enough compression on the spring before the threaded bar snagged on the lower arms lip or at the top I had to drop the lower arm down which is where the seized bolts cursed me.

Drivers side done and near side still to go :(
 

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I've never used a spring compressor for rear springs. trolley jack under the rear suspension arm, undo rear lower suspension arm bolt, bottom shocker bolt, lower arm down spring should be free.
 

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I'm also looking for a video on how to remove the front spring on Kuga Mk1. I found a video but it's for a US Ford espace 2017. The front suspension looks similar to the Kuga. Is this car a Kuga? Any info on how to carry out this job is much appreciated.
 

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So what we are saying is the front shock absorber and spring assembly won't clear the hub for disassembly?
Most Fords I've worked on you can, but must admit not done a Kuga yet.

So What Kiethmac is saying, split the ball joint & track rod end. The main nut on the driveshaft I would have thought be a problem to those with 'normal' tools. (And tightening after). I would have a serious look at the CV boot & wishbone whilst stripped. I'm thinking of a new set of shocks at 70k miles so watching the forum.
 

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For maybe approx. 1.5 hours labour per side I think I would be buying my own springs / shocks and getting a garage to do the front. I have always done my own but trying to remove the bottom ball joints from the bottom wishbone on my Mazda 6 was a no go. Least the garage had one side that was easy to undo. Cost me a couple of hours labour and sometimes things are best done by others especially when I have lots of other things to be doing.
 

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Smartguy69 I've had a few in my time. depends on the marque, sometimes they give you room others make it a complete b'stard.

A chisel to open the groove helps and a good hydraulic ball joint splitter helps. but if no room then brut force helps. The most memorable one was a 04 Mitsubishi, bent the (scrap) wishbone hammering it off. (Volvo V40 in disguise)

Some ping, some need talking to, other just need a good.... The bottom ball joint is to me, the hardest part of disassembly.
 

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Thank you all for your replies. I am now having second thought about doing this myself. I have done this on an old Xr3i it was not easy. I recently had a quote for £200, I think it's reasonable.
 

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Smartguy69 I've had a few in my time. depends on the marque, sometimes they give you room others make it a complete b'stard.

A chisel to open the groove helps and a good hydraulic ball joint splitter helps. but if no room then brut force helps. The most memorable one was a 04 Mitsubishi, bent the (scrap) wishbone hammering it off. (Volvo V40 in disguise)

Some ping, some need talking to, other just need a good.... The bottom ball joint is to me, the hardest part of disassembly.
I use a blunt chisel to spread the ball joint hosing as well.

Much better design than my Mitsubishi GTO, every time I have to split the tapered ball joint on that it cost me a £30 boot..
 

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Smartguy69 I've had a few in my time. depends on the marque, sometimes they give you room others make it a complete b'stard.

A chisel to open the groove helps and a good hydraulic ball joint splitter helps. but if no room then brut force helps. The most memorable one was a 04 Mitsubishi, bent the (scrap) wishbone hammering it off. (Volvo V40 in disguise)

Some ping, some need talking to, other just need a good.... The bottom ball joint is to me, the hardest part of disassembly.
I just couldn't get the bottom wishbone undone from the ball joints. A hydraulic ball joint separator could have been the answer but I didn't have one. The new rubbers were only about £1 each but I let the garage do it. Funny how all 4 rubbers had split like with a stanley knife following MOT at a different garage and they said they could not replace the rubbers and had to be complete wishbones. EXPENSIVE. Second garage knew the MOT tester from the first garage and the people on reception looked at each other and got me thinking, were the rubbers split on purpose. Whatever, I haven't been back to the first garage since. I would have done them myself but decided now I am getting too old to be doing these sort of things. I have a go now and if I come across a problem off to the garage it goes. Have only done discs and pads on the kuga and that's about as far as I go now and not keen on getting my hands dirty now although I did get given this excellent box of surgical gloves which may need using at some point.
 

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I use a blunt chisel to spread the ball joint hosing as well.

Much better design than my Mitsubishi GTO, every time I have to split the tapered ball joint on that it cost me a £30 boot..
All my chisels are blunt, Keith. Even my wood ones. The bottom ball joint on the mazda 6 goes into a hole, not split.
 

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I ground down a large allen key into an oval-ish profile. Pop it in the split (after removing the bolt!) and then tap it round 90 degrees with a hammer. Spreads the split like a treat, the strut comes out easy and goes back the same. Ford have an official tool for this, but it's essentially the same thing.
 

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I did something similar to this but using a large screwdriver as Ford was asking silly money for the official tool.
Do you have to undo the bottom wishbone to do remove the strut on the Kuga?
 
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