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Discussion Starter #1
For a 2017 auto/petrol kuga vignale with EPB, i have the new disks & pads, piston wind-back tool, axle-stands, trolley-jack, copper-grease, WD40, and i think i have the necessary hand-tools. I have also noted the procedure for applying the EPB in 'maintenance mode' ...but i also assume i can just turn the ignition on and release the EPB, as long as the vehicle is well chocked?

Is there anything else i may need before i undertake this job in the cold winter on my driveway i.e.

Is it hex bolts (or torx) securing the calipers - what size are they?
Do the new discs need squared/centred to ensure they run true?
Do i require any other specific lube on calipers or the back of the pads?
Is it ok to re-use the existing caliper/pad springs?

Thanks in anticipation... :eek:)
 

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Mine will be due once the 2nd set of pads are worn out (cable park brake)

Is it hex bolts (or torx) securing the calipers - what size are they?
The fronts are Hex, quite large (22?) but rears could be torx.. BUT they will be tight with locktite thread lock from factory,
Make sure you position yourself with a good bar & socket (6 sided preferred or torx), chew these up and your day will go downhill fast!

Do the new discs need squared/centred to ensure they run true?
Clean any rust off the face of the hub, especially round the center, apply heat resistant copper grease on center and fit.
New disc will need cleaning on the braking surfaces to remove packing oil. Petrol or a solvent on a rag.

Do i require any other specific lube on calipers or the back of the pads? heat resistant copper copper grease a smear on bake of pads only. Others may say no, other may say special pads grease that you can get. Make sure the pads are free to move, if they are jammed in, remove and investigate. (rust under the thin metal slider, recent Astra was bad)

Is it ok to re-use the existing caliper/pad springs? good quality pads should come with fresh springs, bolts (capiler not carrier) sometimes with fresh sliders. (thin metal pieces that pads sit on)
Clean everything up, and you will be able to buy new from a quality braking supplier.

Last off ensure sliding pins on caliper are free to slide, remove and clean if they don't.
Hope that helps.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Yes that has helped and encouraged me to get on with it - many thanks. I have just opened the box (from Motaquip) and am impressed to see the new pads come with springs, backing plates, compound and fitting instructions. (y)
 

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Just one other thing to note I'm sure putting the rear brakes into maintenance mode on epb vehicles puts the pistons back into the caliper so I wouldn't be trying to wind them in as you've noted you have a piston rewind tool, you would only wind the caliper piston in on cable operated handbrakes I'm sure someone will correct me if I'm wrong
 

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I'm afraid (I am 95% sure) you are wrong.

When the EPB system winds back (from your maintenance mode) It won't pull the piston back as you think it would.
Once the EPB is wound back it creates a space behind the piston. Then you push the piston back via a tool. The piston has to be rotated as it is pushed, it will have areas for lugs to engage with. I have put a picture of mine on here somewhere.

All the rear EPB's I have done so far have been like this.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks Mad Skiier, when i did my research that is how i understood it to work too. As the existing pads are hardly worn on mine, i am not expecting to have to push (& twist) the pistons back-in by much at-all. However i got the tool just-in-case (y)

Also, as this is my first experience with an EPB, i imagine those brake motors must deliver a really strong grip. Hence it sounds like it might be an impossible job without 'maintenance mode'? So i am also curious whether the EPB is fail-safe i.e. are they powered to 'apply' the rear brakes or powered to 'disengage' (or both). In an emergency (or crashed/broken vehicle etc) theoretically could one apply an external 12v supply to the motors to engage/disengage them?

No-doubt i will work it all out when i get off my lazy butt and do the job :D
 

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following this post with interest as I'll do mine when needed so vignale keep us posted on how it goes
 

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without a maintenance mode setting, on some you remove the servo motor and wind back the motor. (5 series bmw) then it resets itself.

I don't think it is a fail safe system, or else the caliper will be supping battery dry when parked. Its a DC motor on a fine screw thread, when it hits the torque (via current set) it switches off, when you press brake release it winds back a part amount (note not fully as compensates for pad wear) and off you go.

VW passats had them first, and caused great problems at first, other marques have learnt from this.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
That makes a lot of sense and explains how one can get such a powerful, reliable parking brake out of a 12v DC motor. I feel more confident about the system now and it seems very reliable. So i will also be looking to see whether the EPB motors can be wound (on or off) manually? I have sometimes noticed (or imagined) the brake pedal travels just a wee bit further on first application, hence i wonder if that is caused by the level of 'wind-back' when the EPB is released.

Related topic, my last Ford was auto transmission with a standard manual/cable operated handbrake and i liked the fact that it had some form of hill-start, preventing it rolling-back upon take-off. I assumed that feature was transmission related but i did not really think about it until now!

My current Kuga is also auto transmission but takes this further, it won't roll-back and automatically releases the EPB upon take-off, which is obviously a good feature of the EPB. Does that mean the Kuga also has some form of hill-start in its auto transmission, in-addition to the EPB?
 

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I think you've all got the wrong end of the stick with EPB; surely it's the same as truck handbrake, where the air releases the HB... In years gone by I had a Bedford TK horsebox, and you had to wait for enough air to build up to release the HB. The EPB must be spring applied, and electrically released...
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Nope G ...this is just a family 4x4, its not a truck so there is no air anywhere. They operate just as M (above) has stated. The whirring noise heard when operating is the EPB motor 'winding' the caliper in & out.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Job done! - These Fords are easy to work on, all completed in just a couple of hours and without so-much as a skint knuckle.

Safety first, so i worked on one corner at a time using two jacks and two axle stands. I could have reduced the job time if i had jacked-up the whole rear-end.

Maintenance Mode was confusing because there was nothing indicated in the dash. However the EPB was obviously released ok and it presented no problems doing the job.

The electric gun greatly sped-up the spinning on/off many wheel nuts. All properly torqued afterwards.

Caliper sliding bolts are hex (H7) and are easily undone. Tight access on the bottom one so its easier to use an allen key or a 3/8 tool set because the 1/2 drive tools are a bit cumbersome.

Caliper mounting brackets are held onto hubs with two standard 15mm bolts. Again, tight access so its much easier to use a 15mm ratchet ring spanner. These bolts are very tight and are secured with loctite.

Old disks are tight fit to hub, plus had a wee bit rust so they needed a good batter with a large rubber mallet to break the seal between the old disk & hub. Cleaned & greased everything for re-build. ;)Pushed the new disks onto hub and secured temporarily using the wheel nuts whilst re-building the calipers.

I did need the piston wind-back tool but it did not take much pressure to operate and retract the piston for the rebuild. New pads came with springs and anti-rattle backing plates etc. Simple re-assembly.

I measured the brand-new pads at 10mm thick and with my vehicle being low mileage the worn pads looked good (on the outside) at 7mm. However the inner pads were worn to 5 & 6mm. Now made a mental note to always check the inners, it might be the EPB that causes the inners to wear a wee bit sooner?

The vehicle braking has been transformed, without yet being fully bedded-in, they are sharp and strong. EPB works great and auto releases ok when taking-off in either forwards or reverse.

A simpler job than i expected, and well worth the effort ;)


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Nope G ...this is just a family 4x4, its not a truck so there is no air anywhere. They operate just as M (above) has stated. The whirring noise heard when operating is the EPB motor 'winding' the caliper in & out.
So which part of "The EPB must be spring applied, and electrically released..." did you fail to read?


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Discussion Starter #14
Hi Kuga61 :eek:)

Yes, both the rear caliper hydraulic pistons wound clockwise and the resistance was not as hard as i was expecting. So i think i could have easily fashioned something if i did not already have the tool. I also checked but did not have to do anything with the fluid level (the car is too-new to worry about fluid).

Yes, you do hear the EPB motors spinning/retracting ok but without an indication in the dash i just ignored/assumed maintenance mode was 'on'. With the ignition on, it released the EPB, which stays 'released' when the ignition is then switched-off to get on with the job. What i did then get was a constant beeping (& dash warning) when i left the vehicle in neutral (auto transmission) but that was not an issue because i did not need neutral for the whole job, just when i wanted to spin the hubs or check the discs run true etc, so i ignored the 'transmission not in park' warning and just got on with the job. Hence all other three wheels were kept safely chocked.

However, the vehicle must have been in maintenance mode (despite no dash warning) because after i completed the work and started-up for a test drive, the EPB operated ok but then did not auto-release in drive, so i had to manually release it with its lever/switch in-order to pull-away ok.

So i then repeated the maintenance mode procedure (to cancel it) and sure enough (despite no dash warning) the EPB works again as normal, auto-releasing in fwd or reverse when pulling away.

I am really happy with how easy the whole job was and the good quality of the Motaquip parts - Note EPB models have different rear brake pads than the cable operated handbrake models (discs are the same).

Motaquip LVXL1789 (rear) brake pads (for Ford Mondeo!) is what i was supplied / fitted.
 

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EEC & UK rules: I think 5.5 tonnes, could be 6.5, have to have spring brakes, ie: power to off.

The big Merc vans, & VW grafters. The air brake handbrake gives it away.
Vignale: well done, the 15mm bolt appears again eh! Were the calipers free to slide on the pins.

Fords are easy, Kuga typical, and so far been OK to work on. (Torx fest though!)

Also for Kuga Information: mine is cable handbrake and are Ferodo pad FBD1766 Vauxhall Vectra pads.
From the pictures posted do look the same: (Don't shoot the mad skier check 1st!)
If you cross reference them I expect them to be the same.... (head on the block!)
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Hi M
Yes, i was pleased at how fresh & clean the two caliper pins were, so when the EPB is released the calipers do move/slide very easily by hand. It was a relatively long movement when the hydraulic piston was also fully retracted.
My local parts shop was great but they had the benefit of my photographs before supplying the pads making it clear mine was EPB. Their system displayed diagrams with very little to choose between the two types of pads (it was buried in their text) so they were pleased to be able to supply the correct pads for an EPB.
I am going to go back to them and also purchase a set of front pads by Motaquip :)
 

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Mota quip are good gear, My fronts are TRW Part No GBD2009. for your cross Reference.

Fronts are far easier than the rears, for starters you can put the lock on to work on them instead of your head under a wheel arch. (Watch your brake fluid level when pushing piston back)

One pad (inside one) has a clip that fits in the hollow of the piston, do that first, outer pad fits on the carrier. Then place caliper over the top and reassemble 2 off bolts (12mm?). EASY job, and Ford not changed that idea since early 90's.

If changing the discs at the same time (I did), carrier off, persuade it off with a mallet (rotate disc so even persuasion)
IF not, INSPECT the inside of the disc for corrosion, its frightening, then make a decision..

One split on here Mk1, due to corrosion.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
For reference, here are the part numbers i used;

Rear Discs - Motaquip LVBD1781
Rear Pads - Motaquip LVXL1789
Front Pads - Motaquip LVXL1756

The original Ford pads (front) which came off the vehicle had these numbers printed on the back of the front pads;
BV61-2K021-AC
F4273FF
(nothing printed on the old rear pads)
 
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