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Hi all, I have owned my 2013 Kuga 4x4 for around 6 months now, i really love this car.
I have developed a noise from the rear, a rumbling sound, so had planned some time to take a look.
Not knowing much about this transmission, i got down in my hands and knees earlier to take a quick peak!
To my astonishment... Both rear drive shafts are missing!
The inner joints are present and a small portion of the driveshaft , but nothing to the rear wheels!
Any ideas folks why this has been done by the previous owner?
Many thanks in advance :)
 

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Probably a failure in the Haldex unit and to save an expensive repair they have simply removed the driveshafts!

Lucky that you didn't need 4WD.
 

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Thank you Nigel, just trying to guess where to start now? pop new driveshafts on i see what comes up i guess?
 

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That's unbelievable and I'm surprised it hasn't thrown a code.

The Mk2 is Ford/JTEKT magnetic clutches not Haldex.

Have you had a look at the front?, a few people recently have been replacing the front transfer boxes.

Is it Auto or Manual, CV61?.
 

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That's unbelievable and I'm surprised it hasn't thrown a code.

The Mk2 is Ford/JTEKT magnetic clutches not Haldex.

Have you had a look at the front?, a few people recently have been replacing the front transfer boxes.

Is it Auto or Manual, CV61?.

I would also check that the sensors that would throw a code have not been by-passed or removed.

I would get it to a good independent garage to check the function of the rear unit before you start buying and fitting parts.

I encountered this once before on the Vauxhall Mokka forum where a dealer had removed the driveshafts from a totally shot rear box on a Mokka 4x4.
 

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That's unbelievable and I'm surprised it hasn't thrown a code.

The Mk2 is Ford/JTEKT magnetic clutches not Haldex.

Have you had a look at the front?, a few people recently have been replacing the front transfer boxes.

Is it Auto or Manual, CV61?.
Hi Thank you for your reply, its a manual
 

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What does your iAWD info screen say when driving? Unless its been reprogrammed or altered in some way I just can't see how it drives. Or you not playing hard enough.

As I understand it, (with no rear driveshafts in place) You will set off and accelerate iAWD will spread the torque to all 4 wheels. The rear diff will be rotating in free space. AHH but the sensors are via the ABS system, and no wheel spin detected, so it thinks its sending power to the rear. Which also proves that it cant send 100% to the rear (like Ford say)
So there cant be a sensor (or disabled somehow) on the diff outputs, and ABS speed via the shaft speed, on tarmac get away with it, on snow or mud, it must confuse something.

Please post some pics, I would be interested what would happen if one wheel jacked off the floor.

Does sound like the rear diff is tired somehow, How many miles? Also the oil in the rear diff can't be easily changed, does that say something for the rest of us?

Freelander 2 owners do a similar thing, due to transmission wind up and for MPG reasons.
 

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I've looked at my Powershift and I it's a funny setup, the PTU at the front has a hollow shaft, offside front wheel is driven independently (passed through).

I can only see 50/50 split happening, there is only 2 clutches in the gearbox and no way to "release" the front wheels.

I suppose if the fronts are both spinning and the rears are driving then you could class it as rear wheel biased?.
 

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If the fronts are spinning, its not for long, the front brakes are applied (for a split second) to divert torque to the rear.

The system uses the brake system instead of a limited slip diff. (Landrover experimented with it in the 90's)

I had the fronts on wet grass, rears on tarmac, and what happened was as per above. Similar turning on my steep drive full of compact snow.

I would like mediaman to try and see what happens.

Beginning to think the iAWD readout is just a volt meter reading just telling us the signal to 'how tight' the magnetic clutch is being told to do. Not a torque read out. Sit at the lights, put in neutral and blip the throttle, the iAWD display 'revs' up even though no wheels turning. Hmm!
 

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Yeh IAWD display could be requested rear torque?.

When accelerating on dry tarmac it shows bias to the rear but the front brakes are definitely not being applied. Very odd!.

Can see how it could work on loose gravel etc when wheels have lost traction but not on bone dry tarmac (more than 50% to rear).
 

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I think the readout for IAWD is just smoke and mirrors. Mine will show complete rear wheel drive if I stand on the throttle and let it redline.
It's still a FWD transaxle so they can't disconnect drive to the front wheels, the display is only for bragging rights in the pub.
 

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I think you are right. I pulled over deliberately on a lay by, 2 wheels on wet mud, the other 2 on tarmac. At the time 1 tyre was a road tyre so would clog and spin easier.

What happened when I launched it? Wheels spun a bit, traction control light flickered and off it went. iAWD readout should have shown bias one side or another, but no just the normal, showing drive to all four.
 
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I think you are right. I pulled over deliberately on a lay by, 2 wheels on wet mud, the other 2 on tarmac. At the time 1 tyre was a road tyre so would clog and spin easier.

What happened when I launched it? Wheels spun a bit, traction control light flickered and off it went. iAWD readout should have shown bias one side or another, but no just the normal, showing drive to all four.
A massive thank you for your time and effort guys, as mad skier said earlier, the 4wd icon on the dash kicks in when sitting stationary and just revving the car, so unsure what it is reading.
I am struggling to understand this system!
Thank you again
 

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I'll try then:
Mainly a FWD car, but a small gearbox attached to the main gearbox sends drive to the rear diff. (As per picture, not Ford, it is a freelander / Evoque in 2012) This is know as a transfer box or a PTU (Power Transfer Unit)

All this does is rotate a driveshaft to the rear, on tarmac, steady speed, just spins, no drive on rear, FWD only.

The haldex system uses a hydraulic system to engage clutches (similar to a motorbike multi plate clutch) to drive the rear wheels. When something is detected, pitch, yaw, wheel spin, acceleration etc...

Some you tube clips explain this. Overtime can cause problems with lack of oil change, filters etc. JLR have refined the system and I think up to Mk4 or more on the E pace / F pace.

The JEKT system (Mk2 Kuga), same principle but instead of hydraulics uses magnetic clutches and a bit of technical wizardry. All Ford say is torque transferred to all wheels, but never actually say how it works.

The fancy bit is when it decides to work, otherwise stays in FWD to maximise MPG.

Hope that helps. As from picture there is a clutch assembly (ball bearing variable torq thing at the front of the rear diff)
NOT FORD.jpg rear-axle-mechanism-awd-4x4-system-car-technology-ford-kuga-ii-my-D2WCP6.jpg
 

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Can see how it could work on loose gravel etc when wheels have lost traction but not on bone dry tarmac (more than 50% to rear).
It's torque bias displayed. You don't need wheel slip for a torque change.

It definitely works well on sealed roads. I haven't been able to induce wheel spin when turning or accelerating. Even in the wet it's hard to induce wheel spin. If it was FWD only the 2.0l EcoBoost would smoke up a front tyre very quickly (as some people on the US forums have mentioned- they get the 2.0l EcoBoost as a FWD!)

The iAWD has saved me off road in some sand from getting bogged. I wouldn't say it's a very capable system off road though; it behaves the same as on road and reverts to FWD once you're up to a "cruising" speed. Most likely because the system will overheat if it's subjected to a lot of demand.

This video shows the iAWD in snow
 

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Excellent video clip, conclusion: capable to pull you out of the do do. (mine has)
Towing, they are excellent, it might have the guise of a family car, but has some truck grunt when it wants.

But not a full off road 4x4. (We know that, too many expensive bits to knock off underneath)

The 'T' word did come out …. Tyres..

A mate of mine had a 163 FWD, heavy footed, and a set of fronts chewed at about 21,000 mls, like Murcod said setting off at junctions. The iAWD spreads the torque on take off, my tyres are 6mm left after 21,000. That says something.

Mediaman, you might notice fronts are wearing more, the rears at the moment just hold the back end up!

A hot Focus with the iAWD must me amazing on a hill climb, Transit van with the same system, again just enough to get you out of the ****, be aimed at the ski resort minibus market? (Normally VW Transporters)

Ford must be happy with it, in a good range of cars / vans now.
 
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Mine will show complete rear wheel drive if I stand on the throttle and let it redline.
I was thinking about that- my guess is it's displaying what torque split the iAWD is going to apply. Much like as soon as you go to accelerate from a standing start the display changes. It's proactive rather than reactive like a Haldex system- where wheel slip is required before the AWD reacts. So it's probably got 3D mapping where it will give a predetermined torque split depending on various sensor inputs.
 

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I was thinking about that- my guess is it's displaying what torque split the iAWD is going to apply. Much like as soon as you go to accelerate from a standing start the display changes. It's proactive rather than reactive like a Haldex system- where wheel slip is required before the AWD reacts. So it's probably got 3D mapping where it will give a predetermined torque split depending on various sensor inputs.
I agree what you're saying David. However as it's basically a FWD transmission with a PTU bolted to it, there is no way for the front drive to be reduce, only increase on the torque sent to the rear.
However I still rate it as the best performing SUV AWD system, you can't make it break traction no matter how hard you try.
 

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I agree what you're saying David. However as it's basically a FWD transmission with a PTU bolted to it, there is no way for the front drive to be reduce, only increase on the torque sent to the rear.
Okay, I get what you're saying. It should only be able to go from 100% front/ 0% rear to 50% front/ 50% rear split.

I was wondering how the Focus RS manages to do the "Drift Mode" if it too was limited to a theoretical maximum 50:50 split- it turns out they use a 1.8% higher ratio diff in the rear. However the engineers still talk about 100% of the drive going to the rear if the front wheels lose traction:

"It has a pre-emptive torque control, just like a normal on-demand system," Fritz said. "There is no center differential so we tend to avoid talking about torque splits, because it confuses people when they're thinking about a differential. Our active, on-demand system can send up to 100 percent of the available torque to the rear axle. Once it hits the rear axle, it can send up to 100 percent of that torque to individual left or right sides. If you were [in a scenario where] the front wheels were losing traction, then 100 percent of the torque to drive the car is going to the rear axle."

That's a GKN system where the Kuga uses JTEKT to my knowledge.

I also had a 1990 Ford Laser TX3 4WD turbo (front wheel drive based with PTU) and that was supposed to have a 45:55 torque split front to rear with a viscous 4WD system. It certainly drove like it was rear biased. Like this Ford Laser TX3 Turbo 4WD - Buyer's Guide - but there's nothing mentioned about the torque split in that article. Perhaps it was done with different diff ratios like in the RS???

It's all very confusing!
 
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