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hi we have a 2014 xsport awd powershift on hearing all these stories about dodgy powershift has anyone got one that has done over 70000 miles with no gearbox problems
 

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I have done 50000 miles in my 2.0 litre titanium Powershift so Is. it going to go bang at 70000 thanks
 

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I've done 46k in mine, had the oil and filter changed at 38000. No probs so far, touch wood.
 

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Have a read of my "build thread", or just have a look through the pictures.

The clutch assemble is very poorly designed, plastic spring guides wear out/ disintegrate and the resulting plastic soup gets pumped through the entire gearbox/ mechatronic unit. The main pre-filter (which can only be replaced by splitting the gearbox case) also gets blocked by plastic debris.


This was my clutch pack, nothing more than shockingly bad material/ design choice unfortunately.

There are companies who basically specialise in rebuilding just these gearboxes as there are that many going wrong (which they all will eventually).

20190519_140151.jpg
 

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Whoah!! That is indeed some very disturbing news (as is the photo of the internal bits).....
Is this the first time you have seen keithmacs' post on this. Looks like someone has not done their R&D properly on the gearbox or someone has decided to save a penny or two by ordering the the spring retainers in the wrong material. That could be down to the company who supplied the parts. After all plastic is plastic isn't it......not. Irrespective of the right material or not the whole design is just a recipe for disaster with costly consequences and if ford knew the design was ok, they wouldn't have changed it.
 

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Yep, that's a first for me....Impressive, this is (not), plastic is a recipe for disaster even in electric windows' motors (don't say VAG anyone), whoever thought "hey, let's put some plastic bits inside to make sure it can't outlive a summer fly" should be commented for applying planned obsolescence with maximum effort ;)
 

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My dad worked with nylon back in the 70's and some of the material he machined was extremely strong and had excellent durability for heat and wear but those bits in the gearbox just look they have got hot, gone hard and cracked. They just look to be the same plastic that stops you getting electrocuted on the fan motor wires on a central heating boiler, if you don't turn the electric off. The terminal covers just disintegrated last time I changed the fan and obviously broke due to the heat.
 

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The entire torqued of the engine goes through those guides.

So fully loaded Kuga 2250kg + 2100kg towing weight acellerating from a dead stop on a hill through bloody plastic.

I work on motorcycle engines for a living (25 years), have done a fair few car gearbox rebuilds as well and have never seen plastic anywhere on load transferring parts.

Just stupid imho..
 

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For Keithmac.....
With your experience of the Powershift transmission, do you feel the changes Ford have made post 2017 (and other changes since) have made this transmission set up more durable? Have they finally ironed out the major faults?
We have a late 2019 Vignale Powershift and I plan to change the transmission oil at 25,000 miles and there after. The car doesn't tow or spend time crawling in long traffic queues and I was hoping the car will give us long service.

Thanks, Pete.
 

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For Keithmac.....
With your experience of the Powershift transmission, do you feel the changes Ford have made post 2017 (and other changes since) have made this transmission set up more durable? Have they finally ironed out the major faults?
We have a late 2019 Vignale Powershift and I plan to change the transmission oil at 25,000 miles and there after. The car doesn't tow or spend time crawling in long traffic queues and I was hoping the car will give us long service.

Thanks, Pete.
Hello Pete, they have removed the Major failure point (the clutch damper assy) with the 2017 on Powershift design.

The valvebody is also subtly different and they have improved the clutch solenoids.

The weak link (if there is one) will be the dual mass flywheel but that is an easy replacement and I can't really see that having any issues with normal driving.

I wouldn't have any concerns with your 2019 Kuga, doing oil changes every 25,000 miles is a good preventative measure.

I would have eventually bought a newer (or new) Kuga but after all we've been through with our 2013 and complete lack of interest from Ford we'll be going for another marque for our next family car.
 

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Thanks Keithmac.....A bit of reassurance.
This is our third Kuga and first auto. My wife and I love it to bits - what a great car and lovely to drive.
Sad you have had the issues with yours and Ford have not played ball.
Great write up on your transmission change - thanks.
I hope things work out better for you in the future whatever car make you go for.

Regards, Pete.
 

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Hello Pete, yes they are a lovely car and hope you have many years of trouble free motoring ahead.

Was looking at a Skoda Kodiaq but will be a few years now before we change again!.
 

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I work on motorcycle engines for a living (25 years), have done a fair few car gearbox rebuilds as well and have never seen plastic anywhere on load transferring parts.

Just stupid imho..
[/QUOTE]
If only car manufacturers took a leaf from the book of motorcycle manufacturers. I am sure even motorcycle manufacturers get it wrong at some point but the only one that comes to mind for me from the Japanese was Honda's VF engines before the birth of the VFR. Over engineering at its best from Honda from about 1990 I think. You will probably see more failures doing the job you do as well as poor designs or weak/ common failures but the majority are probably extremely reliable. It's quite rare as well to see an engine failure on the track in racing these days.

I have an old CBR600FN in my garage that is on my agenda to repair and restore. It broke down during one winter when it had an infestation of mice in the airbox. I thought the throttle cable had seized over the winter but on stripping it down and removing the air filter, I was faced with a nest. OMG what a mess. All the carp had gone into number 1 carb. I cleaned it all out with carb cleaner and got it running but it wouldn't tick over properly so possibly one of the jets is blocked. I managed to get hold of a spare set of carbs just in case and that's where it's left. Last winter took its toll though and the forks have degraded so will need to renew them or have them stripped and hard chromed. Expensive though and it will need a couple of tyres too as it's probably not seen the road in 5 or 6 years. I put it in gear a good few times a year and keep the engine turned over. Body paintwork is all very good though and hoping to get it ready for the vintage car and bike run in the summer. Evidently it's classed as a classic now being over 25 years old.
 

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I have a 2017 Kuga 180 powershift it was built on 20th December 2016 is this likely to have problems? What is my powershift likely to be spec wise?

Primary Features

Build Date:21.12.2016
Vehicle Line:Kuga 2012-
Body Style:Sport Utility Vehicle
Version:Series 57
Engine:2.0L Duratorq-TDCi (132kW/180PS)
Transmission:6 Speed Powershift 6DCT450 - MPS6
Drive:RHD 4WD (PTD)
Emission:Euro 6 Emissions
Air Conditioning:Dual Zone Auto Temp Control A/C
Territory:(+)"GB"
Paint:Deep Impact Blue (Metallic)
Interior Fabric:Groove / Salerno / Charcoal Black
 

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I have a 2017 Kuga 180 powershift it was built on 20th December 2016 is this likely to have problems? What is my powershift likely to be spec wise?

Primary Features

Build Date:21.12.2016
Vehicle Line:Kuga 2012-
Body Style:Sport Utility Vehicle
Version:Series 57
Engine:2.0L Duratorq-TDCi (132kW/180PS)
Transmission:6 Speed Powershift 6DCT450 - MPS6
Drive:RHD 4WD (PTD)
Emission:Euro 6 Emissions
Air Conditioning:Dual Zone Auto Temp Control A/C
Territory:(+)"GB"
Paint:Deep Impact Blue (Metallic)
Interior Fabric:Groove / Salerno / Charcoal Black
Can you see the white sticker on top of the gearbox (under the air filter)?, if you can post the number I could give you an answer.
 
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