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Kuga ST Line X 1.5 Eco 180ps 6 Speed Auto AWD Magnetic
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It is a compliment!

I have been told that my humour is not taken as humour at times and that humour can be taken as sarcasm when it is not intended to be sarcasm but humour.

You are on the ball with all your stuff and i dib my hat.
You’re always funny Phill, especially when you’ve been on the sauce and have no control over what you type 🤣🤣
 

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Hi. Good to read how new owners are getting on. I've had my Vignale for 2 months and covered 2500 mm Iles with an economy of 102 mpg. I've charged the battery 3 times a week on average but yet to collect the data to calculate the cost per mile. Whatever the cost it's a really good drive and a real improvement on the 35 mpg I got with my old 180 AWD diesel.
 

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Enjoying the VIN-YA-LEE
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I know that many say the mpg is good but let’s not confuse the issue on mpg.

If you use fuel all the time then the mpg figure can be realistic.

If you fill up with petrol and then charge it up and drive EV only and keep recharging it, I can’t see how it can be claimed that the vehicle is achieving over 100 mpg.

That’s how I look at it anyway but still good mpg for a 2.5 petrol engine.
 

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I know that many say the mpg is good but let’s not confuse the issue on mpg.

If you use fuel all the time then the mpg figure can be realistic.

If you fill up with petrol and then charge it up and drive EV only and keep recharging it, I can’t see how it can be claimed that the vehicle is achieving over 100 mpg.

That’s how I look at it anyway but still good mpg for a 2.5 petrol engine.
A valid point and you need to factor in the electricity supply cost to get a true figure. In my case largely free (solar PV's) but even if paying top whack for your power it is still about 1/3 the cost of diesel per mile.

Comparing an Atkinson cycle engine and Otto cycle engine makes engine size comparison pretty irrelevant.
 

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Ford Kuga PHEV, april 2021, ST Line X, Winter pack, technology pack, retractable towbar
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72 Posts
I know that many say the mpg is good but let’s not confuse the issue on mpg.

If you use fuel all the time then the mpg figure can be realistic.

If you fill up with petrol and then charge it up and drive EV only and keep recharging it, I can’t see how it can be claimed that the vehicle is achieving over 100 mpg.

That’s how I look at it anyway but still good mpg for a 2.5 petrol engine.
Exactly ! Spot on! I just gave you the figures I am getting when using mostly the petrol engine without charging the battery (BTW there are motorways completely flat, but perhaps not in your country - in any case I remember that maybe M1 has a good flat portion, I might remember wrong:) ).
If I change my driving style, I might perhaps get better mpg, but I was just stating what I am getting when driving in a sportive way. I was getting much better mpg from my Mondeo MK5 2.0 180 bhp diesel, with the same driving style. I was just expecting better from a hybrid. But good mpg for a 2.5 petrol engine, though.
 
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2020, Kuga PHEV, ST Line X.
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Exactly ! Spot on! I just gave you the figures I am getting when using mostly the petrol engine without charging the battery (BTW there are motorways completely flat, but perhaps not in your country - in any case I remember that maybe M1 has a good flat portion, I might remember wrong:) ).
If I change my driving style, I might perhaps get better mpg, but I was just stating what I am getting when driving in a sportive way. I was getting much better mpg from my Mondeo MK5 2.0 180 bhp diesel, with the same driving style. I was just expecting better from a hybrid. But good mpg for a 2.5 petrol engine, though.
There is no way for hybrid to be more effitient for long distance highway driving then diesel with comparable engine power. With driving speed over 120kmh there is not much recuperation even on slight downhills and thus you drive the pure gasoline engine. City driving is exact oposite. Thats why its important to choose correct engine type linked to your most frequent driving needs.
 

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Ford Kuga PHEV, april 2021, ST Line X, Winter pack, technology pack, retractable towbar
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I comute every day 25 km to work and 25 km back. This is why I have chosen the PHEV. So, I am using EV only mode all the time.
But for long journeys you are correct.
 
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There is no way for hybrid to be more effitient for long distance highway driving then diesel with comparable engine power. With driving speed over 120kmh there is not much recuperation even on slight downhills and thus you drive the pure gasoline engine. City driving is exact oposite. Thats why its important to choose correct engine type linked to your most frequent driving needs.
A hybrid will approach the diesel on long journeys and be much better on short journeys. The data from several users is here to confirm it. On exactly the same 400 mile journey on French motorways (130kph) with cruise control on our old Mk2.5 diesel managed just over 40mpg, the PHEV 48mpg. I suspect the Mk3 is more aerodynamic, but that is a significant difference. In that 400 miles over 80 were on electric running the car in EV later so effectively pure hybrid (maintaining the battery charge for the ferry port etc)

Engine power is much less important than you may think as at 80mph you only need about 40PS, so whether the car can produce more is irrelevant, it is just down to how efficiently it can produce that 40PS. That comes down to drivetrain efficiency, frictional losses in the engine (less cylinders is better) and then the vehicle drag and rolling resistance.

I agree motorway driving is the hybrid's weakest point but that doesn't mean it can't compete.
 

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2020 Ford Kuga St-Line First Edition 2.5L PHEV Hybrid
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Made two journeys about 50 miles each way last week. Outbound had some electric range (20 miles ish) available, Return journey had no electric available as they had nowhere to charge.

Outbound - some A roads, mostly motorway - 60.1 MPG [52 miles, 23.4 Electric miles, 97% brake score, 94% Driving score - 2.7 miles from regen]
Return - mostly motorway, some A roads - 46.3 MPG [46.4 miles, 9.8 Electric miles, 94% brake score, 90% Driving score - 1.2 miles from regen]

Return journey was mostly sitting on 70mph limiter for most of the motorway as I wanted to get home :p

Recent trip to London had 56.5MPG but there was much more electric available at the start. (Return was 81 miles - 26 electic 54.3mpg)
 

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Made two journeys about 50 miles each way last week. Outbound had some electric range (20 miles ish) available, Return journey had no electric available as they had nowhere to charge.

Outbound - some A roads, mostly motorway - 60.1 MPG [52 miles, 23.4 Electric miles, 97% brake score, 94% Driving score - 2.7 miles from regen]
Return - mostly motorway, some A roads - 46.3 MPG [46.4 miles, 9.8 Electric miles, 94% brake score, 90% Driving score - 1.2 miles from regen]

Return journey was mostly sitting on 70mph limiter for most of the motorway as I wanted to get home :p

Recent trip to London had 56.5MPG but there was much more electric available at the start. (Return was 81 miles - 26 electic 54.3mpg)
Those braking scores and driving scores are why you are getting the economy figures you are, maximising regeneration and use of electricity.
 
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