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Picking up on this I just called my local independent garage and asked about BMS resetting.

Lovely guy, who has been looking after the family cars (apart from the Kuga which is still under warranty) for over forty years.

BMS reset takes "ten minutes including having a tea" using his SnapOn diagnostic tool.

If he is supplying the battery he does it for free, if not, he charges 15 minutes labour (£20).
 

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FORScan can reset BMS (and a LOT more), worth the £20 for adapter (programs free to download).

Varta is the OEM, apparently Varta make Bosch batteries as well (only found this out recently!).

I went for a Bosch from Euro car parts, I really wanted a Yuassa from Halfords (Yuassa are the best in the business imho) but they'd sold it while I was on my way there!.

The Bosch is fine, should do 5 years..
 

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Thanks for that mate. Are the Halfords own brand the good ones your mentioned? Also do you have a link where I could buy the FORscan from sounds good for 20 quid cheers thanks
 

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I live in Derbyshire mate near Bakewell thats very kind of you to offer i an just going to see what mechanic says tomorrow if he doesn't do it for free I will keep it in mind....Just tried the pressing of the rear for light thing for 5 times and the hazard light for 5 times and the after a second the battery light flashes does that mean it's done it or not Lol
 

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£115 to fit a battery is well over the top. When my battery needs replacing they will not be getting my money, Neither will be getting any re programming money.
 

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.Just tried the pressing of the rear for light thing for 5 times and the hazard light for 5 times and the after a second the battery light flashes does that mean it's done it or not Lol
You could check using ForScan :ROFLMAO: , that will give you a figure for the battery life in days. Though that's not very useful info when you're trying do it without any external tools! :confused:
 

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I live in Derbyshire mate near Bakewell thats very kind of you to offer i an just going to see what mechanic says tomorrow if he doesn't do it for free I will keep it in mind....Just tried the pressing of the rear for light thing for 5 times and the hazard light for 5 times and the after a second the battery light flashes does that mean it's done it or not Lol
That's what they found on the community.
 

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Quick update for me on this my mechanic did a battery test and the life was 92% but the charge was only 47% after a good run my stop start is working fully again so thankful for everyone's advise thank god didn't need a new battery few lol
 

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I'd charge the battery up (you can do it on the car).

A battery can take a full day or more to "fully" charge.

When car running check the charge rate with a multimeter although SMART alternator control can do strange things (by design) to the charge rate.

If you only do short journeys it takes a big toll on the battery as it never gets chance to recover fully.
 

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I do a lot of short journeys and I do charge the battery with a smart charger every now and then
and as Keith said it takes a while to be fully charged
 

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A battery can take a full day or more to "fully" charge.
My charger will say it's finished well before 24hrs if I'm topping it up, but is still very warm to touch. If I leave it for a few days it is then a lot cooler to touch, so the battery appears to still be drawing a bit of current after 24hrs. That's using a Cteck 7 Amp charger.

I was checking the State Of Charge via ForScan to also see what happens. IIRC it was reading 82% after 24hrs (and giving the BMS the required 3hrs at less than currect flow 100mA time to do it's calibration.)
 

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Has anyone actually worked out the energy (in ah) taken out of a battery when starting an engine that starts within 2 seconds? Short journey's or not. Check the charging current immediately after starting the car by using a clipon ammeter capable of measuring the starting current of course as it need to be on to measure the charging current immediately. The amount should be replaced within minutes even in winter if the alternator is pushing out 150 amps to supply the electrical accessories and maintain the battery.

The simple charging system of alternator across the battery served motorists pretty well and the introduction of Fords early smart charge helped to ensure that a battery would receive a charging voltage immediately after starting an engine though without battery condition monitoring of course. We now have BCM along with its simplicity or complexity, so there should be no need to float charge a battery unless you are concerned about doing dozens of 5 minute journeys a day or leaving it for weeks on end. I can only imaging that the residual/quiescent current of 100ma means something is seriously wrong if approaching anything near that value other than the pulsed drain for the cars security system and in reality its a mean value of 10ma or so. I know if my car is used within 2 days the stop start will activate at a particular junction 2 miles away (at 40 mph) and it wont if its left for longer. It even operates at this junction on cold morning so its not even set up to keep the engine running to keep the driver or passengers warm :)
 

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Has anyone actually worked out the energy (in ah) taken out of a battery when starting an engine that starts within 2 seconds? Short journey's or not. Check the charging current immediately after starting the car by using a clipon ammeter capable of measuring the starting current of course as it need to be on to measure the charging current immediately. The amount should be replaced within minutes even in winter if the alternator is pushing out 150 amps to supply the electrical accessories and maintain the battery.
Absolutely right, and it's not just the cranking current, if it's cold the glow plugs will draw at least 40A for at least 10 seconds.

Not directly Kuga related, but I have a boat powered by a marinised 1.8 Ford naturally aspirated Fiesta engine.The boat has two sets of batteries; a single 100AH engine start battery, and three 110AH domestic services batteries. Boats "protect" the engine batteries to make sure you always have enough to start the engine, and my boat has a split charge relay, so that when the engine starts, the engine battery is recharged first, and when it matches a preset voltage, the relay clicks over to allow the alternator to charge the domestics. I can hear that happen, as the alternator places load on the engine. It takes less than ten seconds!
 

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Glad you noticed Larry.

Take the Kuga that normally starts first time. Start the engine in 2 seconds at 200 amps, that 0.11 amperhour. If glow plugs are on for 10 seconds, thats another 0.11amperhour, so a total of 0.22 amperhour has been taken out of an 85ah battery.
 
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