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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,

There's a FB group called Ford Kuga Owners - Discussions: https://www.facebook.com/groups/595750127221703/

A lot of folks there seem to complain about their AUTO gearbox serious damage and having to replace it.

I can't help but wonder WTH is that all about. :unsure::oops:

I've been driving cars with auto transmission for more than 20 years and never ever had an issue with any gear-box, let alone having to replace the entire gear-box.

So, is this smth. specific to MK2 EcoBoost and 6F35 auto...? Anything I should be aware of, any "known issues"...?

I'm asking, as I bought mine just a few months ago and would highly appreciate your feedback.

Cheers
 

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I know there were a lot of complaints about the older powershift auto boxes but your MK2 ecoboost should be using the normal torque converter auto box instead of the powershift and haven't really heard of anyone complaining about it yet.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I know there were a lot of complaints about the older powershift auto boxes but your MK2 ecoboost should be using the normal torque converter auto box instead of the powershift and haven't really heard of anyone complaining about it yet.
Powershift is a dual-clutch system ONLY used on diesel 180HP models. 6F35 is the "classical" Torque converter system, which is exactly why I opted for it. My Q is still the same though, as folks were complaining about THIS gear-box, not the Powershift.
 

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What are they saying? It's a closed group so the posts aren't visible.

I have seen posts of 6F35 problems on US Escape forums, but they're 99% ("guesstimate") vehicles with high mileage and unknown/ poor service history. The failure numbers are also very low given one forum I'm on has 22000 members.

Edit: The US also only get the 6F35 auto- not the diesel engine with dual clutch auto. Plus, they get the 2.0l EcoBoost petrol turbo engine (like Australia) which is substantially more powerful than the Euro 1.5l EcoBoost. So if there is a durability problem that engine should highlight it. Some members have also had aftermarket PCM tunes with higher boost levels. The 6F35 is also used in the Lincoln MKC which has the 2.3l EcoBoost petrol engine.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
What are they saying? It's a closed group so the posts aren't visible.

I have seen posts of 6F35 problems on US Escape forums, but they're 99% ("guesstimate") vehicles with high mileage and unknown/ poor service history. The failure numbers are also very low given one forum I'm on has 22000 members.

Edit: The US also only get the 6F35 auto- not the diesel engine with dual clutch auto. Plus, they get the 2.0l EcoBoost petrol turbo engine (like Australia) which is substantially more powerful than the Euro 1.5l EcoBoost. So if there is a durability problem that engine should highlight it. Some members have also had aftermarket PCM tunes with higher boost levels. The 6F35 is also used in the Lincoln MKC which has the 2.3l EcoBoost petrol engine.
Well yeah... that's why I was so puzzled. One girl posted that she has to change the entire gear-box on a car that's almost new... that sounded really strange.

I mean... IDK... I've been driving cars with auto transmission for over 20 years now and never ever had an issue with the gear-box (some had well over 500,000km on them), let alone changing the entire gear-box.

So, as I'm a new Kuga owner I was just wondering if there were any known issues with this particular 6F35... that's all.

P.s.: the FB is closed, but you can apply for membership.
 

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I also have the 6F35 gearbox, it seems to be fairly robust, but not very quick or intuitive.
When mine gets to 50,000ks I plan on changing the oil along with the PTU and rear diff.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I also have the 6F35 gearbox, it seems to be fairly robust, but not very quick or intuitive.
When mine gets to 50,000ks I plan on changing the oil along with the PTU and rear diff.
Where I live we have -20C in the winter and +40C in summer, so oil change twice a year is a given.... regardless how many km/miles are on it. I always change oil simultaneously with changing winter/summer tires and rims. Have the winter tires on a separate set of steel rims. As for auto transmission fluid, I do it each 50,000km, meaning once every 2 years, no matter what the dealer or anyone else says. They all claim you can go 150,000km w/o a change, I don't buy into that.

In 20 years never had an issue with a gear-box...
 

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I also have the 6F35 gearbox, it seems to be fairly robust, but not very quick or intuitive.
When mine gets to 50,000ks I plan on changing the oil along with the PTU and rear diff.
Local dealer has recommended transmission fluid and filter changed at 35000 miles ( service interval on mine is 12500 miles :unsure:). How close to 50000KM that is I dont know, but must be near
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Local dealer has recommended transmission fluid and filter changed at 35000 miles ( service interval on mine is 12500 miles :unsure:). How close to 50000KM that is I dont know, but must be near
Just google it lol and yeah it's near btw
 

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Like Ozekuga said, they seem to be robust but perhaps not the best trans around if you're after fast shifts. Mine is always in "S" as in "D" it frustrates me!

I've driven interstate (about 600km) on a 38-40C day with mine loaded and it did it with ease. The 2.0l EcoBoost engine has 178kW and 345Nm and would put more stress on the trans than the 1.5l (134kW and 240Nm.) In the Lincoln MKC , as I mentioned, it's used with the 2.3l EcoBoost which has 285hp and 305ftlb torque (~212kW and ~414Nm.)

It can get up to around 45C where Ozekuga and I live. Over 40C is common in Summer, but it rarely gets to 0C or below. I'd expect to see a lot of failures on the US Escape forums if there was a widespread issue.
 

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Like Ozekuga said, they seem to be robust but perhaps not the best trans around if you're after fast shifts. Mine is always in "S" as in "D" it frustrates me!

I've driven interstate (about 600km) on a 38-40C day with mine loaded and it did it with ease. The 2.0l EcoBoost engine has 178kW and 345Nm and would put more stress on the trans than the 1.5l (134kW and 240Nm.) In the Lincoln MKC , as I mentioned, it's used with the 2.3l EcoBoost which has 285hp and 305ftlb torque (~212kW and ~414Nm.)

It can get up to around 45C where Ozekuga and I live. Over 40C is common in Summer, but it rarely gets to 0C or below. I'd expect to see a lot of failures on the US Escape forums if there was a widespread issue.
But does the S mode increase the rev range the box changes at if you don't use the flappy paddles. If I am on a clear UK motorway zt 65 mph and drop thee car into S mode, it will downshift a gear and scream the b#*^%$#s of the beast. Do you sacrifice mpg or l/km for rapid gearshifts. I know where I would stand.

I realise the box is not good, shifting from N to D after sitting idling is not smooth and sometimes causes a severe jerk on the car. Maybe as the torque converter spools up, or seems to do 2 changes per gear depending on the speed or rpm. Plus if not booting the car and trying to drive gently the revs don not appear to match the expected speed in the zuto box (1996 was my last auto)
 

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I would say driving in 'S' instead of 'D' probably increases the fuel consumption by 1-2 MPG.
I never worry too much on how economical a car is, just how it goes, so therefore I always drive in 'S' for everyday driving, if on a motorway when you don't need a faster reacting gearshift I use 'D'. If a manual was available with the 2.0l Ecoboost I would have bought it
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Like Ozekuga said, they seem to be robust but perhaps not the best trans around if you're after fast shifts. Mine is always in "S" as in "D" it frustrates me!

I've driven interstate (about 600km) on a 38-40C day with mine loaded and it did it with ease. The 2.0l EcoBoost engine has 178kW and 345Nm and would put more stress on the trans than the 1.5l (134kW and 240Nm.) In the Lincoln MKC , as I mentioned, it's used with the 2.3l EcoBoost which has 285hp and 305ftlb torque (~212kW and ~414Nm.)

It can get up to around 45C where Ozekuga and I live. Over 40C is common in Summer, but it rarely gets to 0C or below. I'd expect to see a lot of failures on the US Escape forums if there was a widespread issue.
In Europe, we don't get the 2.0l EcoBoost, it's not marketed over here unfortunately... would've been my preferred engine, w/o it, I had to settle for the 1.5. Climate wise, we got cold winters, with lows going all the way down to -20C and summers can hit +40C on hottest days.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I also have the 6F35 gearbox, it seems to be fairly robust, but not very quick or intuitive.
When mine gets to 50,000ks I plan on changing the oil along with the PTU and rear diff.
Same here - 50K auto-trans oil change.
 

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But does the S mode increase the rev range the box changes at if you don't use the flappy paddles. If I am on a clear UK motorway zt 65 mph and drop thee car into S mode, it will downshift a gear and scream the b#*^%$#s of the beast. Do you sacrifice mpg or l/km for rapid gearshifts. I know where I would stand.
No, mine won't downchange and scream it's head off just because it's in "S" instead of "D". There's a steep long hill near where I live in an 80km/h zone, mine will easily go up it at well under 2000RPM in "S". It you put your foot down a bit it will down shift, but only one gear unless you floor the accelerator. But, that could be the difference in torque coming into play with the 2.0l vs 1.5l EcoBoost. I sit on an average of 10.0l/100km with 95% suburban driving and I've got a few steep hills in the area. I don't drive with max economy in mind and use 98 RON fuel. It seems to up change at around 2500-3000RPM with normal driving.

The main difference I've noticed with "S" is when sedately driving it will not change into as high a gear at 60km/h. "D" will change a gear higher at that speed lugging at around ~1400RPM. Needless to say if you hit a slight hill there's a lack of power at those revs.... requiring a fair bit of accelerator input before it will down change and then it surges forward. "S" changes down sooner, with less accelerator input, so I find that a smoother/ more natural driving experience.

I realise the box is not good, shifting from N to D after sitting idling is not smooth and sometimes causes a severe jerk on the car. Maybe as the torque converter spools up, or seems to do 2 changes per gear depending on the speed or rpm. Plus if not booting the car and trying to drive gently the revs don not appear to match the expected speed in the zuto box (1996 was my last auto)
Mine doesn't do anything like that when going from N to D. After sitting for a while (ie. days) I do find the first change from 2nd to 3rd is a bit slower/ takes a bit longer to "engage" but after that it's fine.
 
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