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Discussion Starter #1
Look, I know many of you know how to drive and may huff, puff and scoff at this article, but maybe it may just helps others to get even better mpg and a smoother drive.

Prior to my life as a cop here in the UK, I was a diesel fitter for 14 years and then along with my advanced driving skills, my Position as a Institute of Advanced Motorists examiner and external driving assessor for the NHS, I’d like to think I can vouch for what I say.

So here we go and a few things you may wish to know.

Petrol engines compared to diesel, weigh less, as there are less severe forces on the go.
So how I pass this on to people at the ambulance station is, do you recall ever going to a country fair and seeing the large machinery with the very large flywheel. Well it’s the mass that is stored in that Huge chunk of metal that does the majority of the work and then engine basically “tops” it up, when it fires.

So roll a penny on the kitchen work surface and it’s easy to stop. Do the same with a pound coin and there’s more of this in your hand to stop it. Get it, hope so.

So if a petrol engines weighs, let’s say, 150lbs, a diesel engine may weigh 200lbs. This is due to the fact that there are more stresses from the compression and combustion and the components are more more robustly and are much heavier.

So when then the Diesel engine is running, just due that fact that everything is heavier and is turning it will literally pull the vehicle away, where as the light components of the petrol will just stall.

Petrol gives lots of instant power and is like Mr Bolt, very quick of the mark.
Diesel fuel burns for a longer period of time so has a longer stroke to allow this and is like Mo Farrar and is there for the long run.

So once you have the engine running and the “torque” or twisting efficiency is on the go, it’s a case of just giving a helping hand.

Bear with me, nearly at the end........

The human body consists of many things and one of them is “motor skills” (no pun intended”
So they way I introduced this and you can try this is to move you right foot up and down fully. This is a rough motor skill.
Now, instead of doing that, flex your toes only and that’s a fine motor skill. .

So when your in any vehicle, instead of pressing the whole foot down “rough skill”, just flex your toes on the accelerator pedal “fine skill” and the transformation is a more subtle transition of power and there for uses less diesel. I say diesel because all this works better in that type of engine.

Remember petrol is big squirts of fuel and diesel is little squirts.

So, we have to set off and there’s no getting around that. But once you’ve set off, using your observations, planning, gears and positioning etc all you have to do is just top of the slowing mass of the vehicle to keep it smooth and nicely flowing.

All too often people don’t do that, they accelerate then brake, which uses up the brakes and uses more fuel.

Petrol engines run at, what, 35% efficiency and diesel at 37% ish, so we have to make the best at what we have.

Why accelerate towards red traffic lights, then to stop, it’s just bonkers. If time right you can go through without stopping etc and save lots of everything.

It doesn’t take much to convert and it soon becomes second nature and a skill for like.

The Kuga has a lovely foot pad to the right and I flex my toes sideways on the acc pedal and it works wonders. It also works very nice of the brake pedal and I taught the queens driver all he need to know. You don’t see him making the Queens spill her Pimms.

Here’s a quick test for you.
Find a incline that you can reverse up safely. Try it in a petrol engine on tick over and I bet it stalls, unless it a mega huge CC.
Then try it in a diesel on tick tick over , no acc just clutch out. It’ll do the job nicely. We do it in ambulances and it never fails to have somebody’s mouth open, as they’d be usually revving the nuts of the engine.

Anyway hope this helps.
 

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I'm not 100% sure what you are saying ? I always thought there was less stress on a diesel engine than a petrol. Diesel burns so there is less stress on the pistons, the small ends & the crankshaft etc. Where as petrol explodes & causes a lot more stress, that's why diesel engines last longer.
 

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part 1 by psshaw, part 2 by mad skier

Development of the diesel engine:
Diesel engines were made for constant load applications, generators, ships, trains etc.
They needed long strokes to produce the heat to make that oil go bang. So like what psshaw said, needed a large flywheel to store energy to be 'reclaimed' during the compression stroke. These very rarely reved to 2,000 revs or not much more.

So somebody wanted them in a automotive application, the car. but revving them up and down is required, lights, roundabouts junctions etc. (Early Diesel landrovers, put you foot down on a RED light, it might be revving enough to set off when it turns green!)

1: Lower weight: shorten the stroke and rotating mass, so can accelerate the rotating mass quicker. Ahh that reduces compression. so...

2: Turbo it.. Shove more air in, put 3ltr of air in a 2ltr engine and get 40% more power (for same weight of engine)
3: Make it breathe easier- now 4 valve per cylinder. You can shorten the stroke further.
4: That air is hot from the turbo, add a intercooler. The cooler the air the more oxygens in to go bang with that oil.
4a: Variable vane turbo, WW2 technology, helps the turbo accelerate quicker to eliminate 'turbo lag'.

5: Biggest development - fuelling: Throw the diesel pump away and have common rail.
For those not technical: The old diesel pumps gave 1 squirt of fuel at the right time, so one bang.
Common rail, a reservoir of fuel (A heavy tube full of very high pressure fuel) the electronic injectors draw from the reservoir (common rail) then the really clever bit.
Instead of 1 squirt and one bang, multiple gradual squirts. 1st 20% to get the 'fire' started, 2nd 20% then gradually more for a even efficient burn, up to 6 squirts per stroke but at high speeds a gradual progressive squirt.

So no high stress 1 bang, lower stroke, lighter rotating mass (not mentioned dual mass flywheel) free breathing turbo charged diesel we have today.
 
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For every ICE, the rules if you want improved mileage are really quite simple (but not always easy to apply): anticipate, drive smoothly, exploit. Know the road, go with the flow, don't overreact, don't go into open-loop fuel maps, find the sweet spot for cruising speed (since speed-consumption curve is exponential), go into fuel cut-off (cruise in-gear and 0% throttle) as often as possible.

....but personally I drive it like I stole it, just came in here to say it :p
 

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If I wanted to spare 30 horses would have bought a 150! The Kuga is a drivers car.
 
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Discussion Starter #7
The small piston with very short sides (skirts) is from a petrol engine. The other is diesel.
most other parts are also heavier.
so together and with advanced driving skills it can help in fuel economy and a smoother drive.
I don’t think many people buy a kuga to drive it like they stole it but each to their own.
I was trying to help others eek out the best driving style and mpg.
 

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....but personally I drive it like I stole it, just came in here to say it :p
[/QUOTE]

Yes Ace. I think we have gathered that especially with your just three wheels on the ground when you go round corners.
 

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You know what's funny.

I busted one of my tyre recently and have been driving with a spare for a few days.(Getting my tyre replaced today).
So apparently with the spare I cannot drive over 80km/h so have been sticking to that when driving on highway.
And I my avg fuel consumption was around 5.5l/100km pretty close to the stated 5.4l by Ford.

Guess this can be achieved after all but DAMMIT who drives at this speed!
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Your right but I’m retired and have no need to rush or be heavy right footed. Yes I clear it’s throat once in a while.
country road or highway driving should always improve mpg but town centre work just kills it.
Dare not say too much more as the anti max mpg lobby/lead foot society might have a pop.

Not that I give a ?
 

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psshaw (and others) what do you think is the optimum cruising speed for best mpg? [In the Kuga]
At 50ish of course, but seeing what others get at motorway speeds.

FWD & AWD will vary. The reason I ask is that my company Mondeo 1.8TD W reg - 2000, did more mpg at 80+ than 70+

My theory was that the transmission reached its natural frequency, the power and drag equalised itself and mpg rose a little. The 1.8ltr petrols were the same. Now was it because gearing was set for the European motorway market?

Fast forward 20 yrs, the drag effect must be more on the Kuga, (higher than a Mondeo for starters) we have bigger fatter tyres (tyres have less rolling resistance after their bit of development) more torquey motors.

I set my cruise at 74, probably 70-72 actual?? After 76 the mpg figure (as expected drops off) drag starts to kick in and engine revving harder. So FWD Kuga owners can you tell us what the AWD transmission and auto gearboxes for that matter costing us on a cruise?
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Well Mad Skiier, my answer may surprise you.

Surprisingly anything over 60 to 70 mph seems to work for me.

Constant spending mind, motorway stuff with or without cruise. Ok mid 50s works as well but “vinny” just seems to like it up there.

Just to set the dogs loose on myself and you’ll know what I’m about, being on old “black rat know it all , yawn yawn.....for me to get over 500 miles per tank and mid to high 40s, this is what is do, if I’m that way inclined and we’re going on a ride out.

Fill up, set all the trips to zero and get on the motorway and just crack on at 70. Check after 50 miles or so and it’s usually about 47 mpg and it would stay there all day if I continued doing that. Upon return to shaky Wakey and pottering around it’ll drop to 38 ish. Should I go do another trip, weirdly it really won’t increase.

However, should I fill up and reset to zero and potter for, let’s say 100 miles a, then do a trip again weirdly it won’t rise much from the very low 30s.

And again, here comes the weirdly word for the third time, if I do a long run and get the good mpg and it settles to say 38 and I fill up, even if I potter around it won’t drop below that number.

Bizarre I know and some will say that’s freaking stupid, but it does it for me.

Diesel, diesel, diesel ?
 

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The issue with the Kuga at higher speeds is the aerodynamic properties of the car compared with something like the Mondeo... My mileage figures pretty much mirror Psshaw, and with loads of motorway average speed cameras around here, I set cruise at 72mph, which equates to an independent satnav indication of 70mph (the 2mph differential applies at 30, 40, 50 and 60 as well). If I creep up to mid 70's the consumption drops back significantly...
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Filled up, reset all trips, straight onto the A1 north, across North Yks moors, Whitby then home, 174 miles ,43 mpg. ?
 

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Guy's If you keep worrying about the mpg in your Kuga.........……….Your driving the wrong motor :(

We do this on a monthly basis and talk about mpg...…………..if you boot it, it will cost you SIMPLE ;)

But if your happy with the way you like putting diesel/petrol into that little hole in the side of the motor the fantastic lol.
 

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I found the best solution for cutting my fuel costs. I changed jobs and now I work from home lol. The car sits in the drive Monday to Friday collecting carbon from the atmosphere therefore I am saving the planet.

My diesel bill is now about £40 a month.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I’m not worried at all about my mpg. I know it’s a big suv and you shouldn’t expect the world.
I listed it, as others mention it all the time.
I've said it many times before and you can research that fact, I too have said, people are maybe driving the wrong car if they want the best mpg.

I placed thus post to try and help people to get the best mpg.
I coach people who drive ambulances and believe me they haven’t got a clue and don’t give a shite as it’s not there vehicle. The revs the **** off them and have no idea and I guess like most folk don’t understand how they work, so why care. I can see wife mrs / mr average would have no idea and it’s a means of transport.

who cares about the world when your young but when you get to 60ish you understand things better. I bet there is a high percentage of folks, when they look back realise how futile it all was, trying to make a statement or to have an impact when no one really gives a hoot.

if ya wanna boot it fine but people ask cos They want to achieve best figures and ask for a comparison.
 

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I took on board what you said as I have always managed to get a decent mpg out of my vehicles even though I would say I drive my cars quite hard on occasion. On other occasions though I am quite liberal with my right foot and I did find myself the other day just stretching my toes.

I don't think my Kuga is bad on fuel around the town. Slightly better than my Mazda 6. It's the wind drag that gets mine on a run. I am not worried about mpg. It was parting with over £230 and only getting 2 tyres instead of 3 that got me lol. Just saw a deal on eBay and could have to 4 tyres for my old car for the cost of two tyres for the Kuga.
 
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