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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Newbie trying to help daughter. 2017 1.5 TDCi with stop start button.

Last November the car failed to start on first really cold day and home breakdown diagnosed as dead battery. Battery replaced and no problems until now.

Last Tuesdaycar driven 60 miles stopped at local shop, car wouldn't start again. Recovery managed to restart but said alternator faulty.

Car at my daughter's home and cannot be restarted to get to me about 25 miles away ready to fit alternator in my garage. I am a home mechanic but limited experience on cars newer than 20yrs old! I can't get there because I have COVID at the moment.

My daughter has "charged" battery for 8 hours on cheap battery charger but she says never reaches full charge.

Been reading up and found that when a new battery is fitted you need to reset the BCM - I think there is a manual way of doing this but would like confirmation please. Also a friend who is not an expert thinks that the ECU may contain fault codes that is preventing the battery from accepting charge. I do have a cheap Foxwell OBD reader for an old VW I was working with a couple of years ago.

Any help/advice most appreciated. Thanks!
 

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Try this.
 

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Or use the search bar for more links. It鈥檚 BMS by the way.

The AA man told me it would auto reset after a while, although I did reset ours
 

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Dare I ask the leads are on right. .

Red to poz
Black to earth but not the battery pole.

Is the battery charger 12v and not 6v as well?
 

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Some chargers have the 6v 12v 24v option.

As to not taking charge. If the meter on the charger doesn鈥檛 go up much, then it maybe fully charged, then there is another issue.
 

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AA man is wrong @Psshaw unless the car has a crystal ball or is super smart which it isn't yet.

Welcome to the forum @jaspernoonoo .

First question is was the correct battery fitted. Not sure about the 1.5 battery spec but it will have a code on it which will be EFB??? Mine is an EFB110. If a normal lead acid battery has been fitted it's no good for the car. If it is the correct battery remember that sometimes even new batteries can be faulty. The AA, RAC etc cannot perform a simulated load test on the equipment they have and needs a drop test on it. The fact that battery is not accepting charge could be your answer......in it's faulty.

To check the battery at home you need to disconnect the positive lead from the battery, charge the battery up, check the voltage with a voltmeter and then check it again about 12 hours later without connecting it back to the car. Any discrepancy in the volt meter reading = faulty battery. It will not harm the car and you don't need a radio code.

If your battery was flat and 60 miles from home I doubt the car would have got you home if the alternator wasn't working. Note that faulty isn't a good enough report from recovery guy. It's a massive difference between not or under charging and over charging. The car is clever enough to shut systems down if there is an issue like over charging.

From a diagnostics point of view generic readers are not much use for a ford and you need a modded ELM327 and FORScan. Resetting of the BMS can be done with FORScan but there is also a procedure you can do using the cars switches which hopefully one of our members will post. If you are going to be looking after this car then the right OBD reader will be a good investment.
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
AA man is wrong @Psshaw unless the car has a crystal ball or is super smart which it isn't yet.

Welcome to the forum @jaspernoonoo .

First question is was the correct battery fitted. Not sure about the 1.5 battery spec but it will have a code on it which will be EFB??? Mine is an EFB110. If a normal lead acid battery has been fitted it's no good for the car. If it is the correct battery remember that sometimes even new batteries can be faulty. The AA, RAC etc cannot perform a simulated load test on the equipment they have and needs a drop test on it. The fact that battery is not accepting charge could be your answer......in it's faulty.

To check the battery at home you need to disconnect the positive lead from the battery, charge the battery up, check the voltage with a voltmeter and then check it again about 12 hours later without connecting it back to the car. Any discrepancy in the volt meter reading = faulty battery. It will not harm the car and you don't need a radio code.

If your battery was flat and 60 miles from home I doubt the car would have got you home if the alternator wasn't working. Note that faulty isn't a good enough report from recovery guy. It's a massive difference between not or under charging and over charging. The car is clever enough to shut systems down if there is an issue like over charging.

From a diagnostics point of view generic readers are not much use for a ford and you need a modded ELM327 and FORScan. Resetting of the BMS can be done with FORScan but there is also a procedure you can do using the cars switches which hopefully one of our members will post. If you are going to be looking after this car then the right OBD reader will be a good investment.
Thanks very helpful
 

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What do I know馃し鈥嶁檪锔

You listen to what you are told鈥e reset it anyway. 馃
 

Super Moderator and Mr Grumpy
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What do I know馃し鈥嶁檪锔

You listen to what you are told鈥e reset it anyway. 馃
You know loads mate but what the AA man told you is wrong. If there was no need to reset the BMS, it would say so in the workshop manual. The modules on the car reset after a set period but what doesn't change in the car is the days in service of the battery which is what the BMS monitors. What it monitors apart from that and why it monitors days in service I have no idea, but I do know the alternator will only charge the battery if the battery needs it so it may not be pumping 14.4 volts or so in there all the time. I have tried to catch my car when it's not charging the battery but the battery is old so the state of charge is always low around 12.3 volts and therefore alternator is pumping in around 14.4 volts when I have checked it.
 

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As smarty says you need Forscan as well to read the codes. that would be the first thing to do. He's done a write up on how to load it if you're that way inclined. (y)
 

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You know loads mate but sometimes knowledge can be dangerous when it's wrong. If there was no need to reset the BMS, it would say so in the workshop manual. The modules on the car reset after a set period but what doesn't change in the car is the days in service of the battery which is what the BMS monitors. What it monitors apart from that and why it monitors days in service I have no idea, but I do know the alternator will only charge the battery if the battery needs it so it may not be pumping 14.4 volts or so in there all the time. I have tried to catch my car when it's not charging the battery but the battery is old so the state of charge is always low around 12.3 volts and therefore alternator is pumping in around 14.4 volts when I have checked it.
馃挜
 

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A recommended OBD reader would be appreciated - thanks.
One of my cheaper options has come back in stock. This one has a changeover switch which switches below HS and MS CANBUS.

This is the one I have below. This one doesn't need the switch as it's automatic.


Forscan from here. Download FORScan

You will need a laptop but FORScan is easy to use and if you are just resetting things then you don't need a licence which is free for 2 months.

When you manage to get to the car I would have a look in the DTC section of FORScan and see if it has any fault codes stored. You clear them by pressing the SECOND Yellow triangle at the bottom of the screen. There are some tutorials on the FORScan website and YouTube.
 
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You know loads mate but what the AA man told you is wrong. If there was no need to reset the BMS, it would say so in the workshop manual. The modules on the car reset after a set period but what doesn't change in the car is the days in service of the battery which is what the BMS monitors. What it monitors apart from that and why it monitors days in service I have no idea, but I do know the alternator will only charge the battery if the battery needs it so it may not be pumping 14.4 volts or so in there all the time. I have tried to catch my car when it's not charging the battery but the battery is old so the state of charge is always low around 12.3 volts and therefore alternator is pumping in around 14.4 volts when I have checked it.
It monitors days in service because older batteries take a charge less well than newer ones and it adjusts the charging pattern appropriately. That is why as you say when you replace the battery you need to reset the BMS
 

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2017 ST-Line 1.5 TDCi manual
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The correct battery for the Kuga mk 2.5 1.5 diesel is

Manufacturer: FORD
Product Type: Starter battery
Tension: 12v
Amp hours: 75Ah
Manufacturer number: 1 917 577, 1917577
EAN: 4050326498445
 
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